VIP Private Art Viewing and Artist Discussion

In celebration of the 50-year anniversary of the 1964 New York World’s Fair, Onishi Project and Kipton Cronkite are pleased to present “World’s Fairs: Lost Utopias,” the debut exhibition of Jade Doskow’s groundbreaking seven-year photography project. The exhibition includes a 1968 triptych by Robert Rauschenberg, works on paper by Roy Lichtenstein and Keith Haring -- and a dynamic group show featuring Alexandra Posen, Greg Haberny, Naomi Reis, UR New York, Mark Freedman and Vincent Edmond Louis - inspired by the cultural zeitgeist that surrounded this event.

Tuesday, June 3, 2014, 6:00-8:00pm
Onishi Gallery, 521 West 26th Street
Hosted by the KiptonART Foundation

To RSVP and attend, get your ticket at KiptonARTfoundation.org and click the DONATE button above. Donations of $75 or higher will automatically be added to the guest list for the event. Light Fare and beverages will be served, plus a meet-and-greet discussion with artists from the exhibition. Tickets are $75. Any donor who has donated $75 or more to the foundation in the past year will be automatically added to the guest list.

In celebration of the 50-year anniversary of the 1964 New York World’s Fair, Onishi Project and Kipton Cronkite are pleased to present “World’s Fairs: Lost Utopias,” the debut exhibition of Jade Doskow’s groundbreaking seven-year photography project. The exhibition includes a 1968 triptych by Robert Rauschenberg, works on paper by Roy Lichtenstein and Keith Haring -- and a dynamic group show featuring Alexandra Posen, Greg Haberny, Naomi Reis, UR New York, Mark Freedman and Vincent Edmond Louis - inspired by the cultural zeitgeist that surrounded this event.

More details about the event. 
Jade Doskow’s large-scale color photographs illustrate the utopian iconic architecture and art remaining after the close of 1960’s world’s fairs, and the arbitrary nature of what has been preserved, discarded, or repurposed on these sites. In the cities represented here, New York dominates, in celebration of the 50-year anniversary. The crowning glory that still remains is the New York State Pavilion, an unusual, dynamic carousel-like structure designed by Philip Johnson.  Doskow’s two photographs of the Pavilion - from 2007 and 2014 - illustrate the strange beauty of this mammoth creation in various stages of decay and regrowth.  The other cities shown here from this project include Paris, Brussels, Seattle, Montréal, and San Antonio. Major artists---including Jean Arp, Andy Warhol, Ellsworth Kelly, and James Rosenquist---all exhibited new work at the 1960’s world’s fairs, and in the rear gallery one can experience their effect on contemporary artists. One of the most popular attractions at the 1964 New York World’s Fair was It’s a Small World and was sponsored by Walt Disney; Greg Haberny’s mixed media on canvas CIA channels Lichtenstein, exploring the influence of 1960’s pop iconography such as Mickey Mouse while Mark Freedman has created a series of gallery invitation collages based on pages from ArtForum magazine and referencing Warhol, Kelly and Rosenquist. Brooklyn-based artist Naomi Reis perfectly captures the form of Buckminster Fuller’s geodesic dome. Alexandra Posen’s work on paper expresses her intuitive response to artists such as Arp, Rauschenberg and O'Keeffe.